Local Hotels

Hotels

For postcard-perfect long weekends, or full week stays that have exceptional access to indoor and outdoor pools, restaurants, and amenities, there's nothing quite like the convenience of a stay at a local hotel or motel. A number of area hotels have been welcoming guests for decades, and as a result, vacationers have come back year after year for the fantastic service and the million-dollar views.

Vacation Rental Homes

Vacation Rentals

Visitors are often surprised at the number and variety of weekly vacation rentals throughout the area.. Vacation rentals are, in fact, an increasingly popular accommodation available to vacationers, and visitors will find that the sheer number of rentals available allows them to find an ideal retreat to fit their crew, from quiet condo complexes to brightly colored oceanfront sand castles.

Radio Island Beach Access

Radio Island Beach Access

Located on the edge of the Bulkhead Channel which leads to the Back Sound, the Radio Island Beach Access is a unique and wonderfully convenient beach destination for both Morehead City and Beaufort visitors.

Beaufort, NC Fishing Guide

Beaufort, NC Fishing Guide

Beaufort is a community that is obsessed with life on the water, so it should come as no surprise that fishing of all varieties is celebrated in this coastal town that’s found at the intersections of marshy creeks, major rivers, and miles-wide sounds. From casting a fishing line off a local dock in the downtown area, to signing up for a fishing adventure that will take anglers well offshore, the sheer diversity of fishing opportunities - (and great tasting catches) - are what keep anglers coming back year after year for more.

North Carolina Maritime Museum at Beaufort

North Carolina Maritime Museum at Beaufort

Dive into a wealth of coastal artifacts, folklore, and legendary figures with a visit to the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Operating as one of three maritime museums along coastal NC, this distinctive site is known for its unique ship-worthy exterior, its vast collection of exhibits that span centuries, and its close ties with the Southern Outer Banks’ most famous resident, Blackbeard the Pirate.

Crystal Coast Vacation Rentals

Crystal Coast Vacation Rentals

Visitors who are heading to the Crystal Coast will find a scattering of hotels and motels throughout the shoreline and inland communities, but will soon discover that the primary type of accommodations available are vacation rentals. Located all along the Crystal Coast beaches from Atlantic Beach to the town of Emerald Isle, a vacation rental is the generally preferred accommodations option for vacationers thanks to ample space, exceptional locales close to the water, and plenty of homes and condos to choose from.

Top 10 Attractions Beaufort NC

Top 10 Attractions Beaufort NC

Beaufort is a community where history and coastal charm is found around every downtown corner, and where top Crystal Coast restaurants are found side-by-side with historic residences and museums. As a result, it’s an easy task for sightseers to spend an afternoon, a day, or even a full week exploring the collection of sites that are situated in the immediate area, or located just a water taxi ride away.

Shackleford Banks

Shackleford Banks

The Shackleford Banks is part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore, and is a barrier island system that is found just off the coast of Beaufort and Harkers Island, and which is a popular offshore beaching destination for summertime Crystal Coast visitors. Accessible only by a private ferry, water taxi, or personal vessel, the beaches are nevertheless popular with longtime Southern Outer Banks vacationers for their unspoiled beauty, exceptional fishing and shelling, and famed herd of wild ponies, known as the “Banker Horses” or “Banker Ponies.”

Beaufort History

Beaufort History

Established in 1709, and renowned as the third oldest town in the state, Beaufort truly is a community where history comes alive. From dozens of residences that have decorated the local downtown streets for centuries, to hidden landmarks and offshore destinations where pirates used to roam, Beaufort’s history is legendary, romantic, and all-together fascinating.

Rainy Day Activities in Beaufort, NC

Rainy Day Activities in Beaufort, NC

Even a town as sunny as Beaufort can be subjected to the occasional rainy day, but visitors will soon discover that a dreary afternoon is no reason to forego the fun in this small town destination that’s overflowing with on-site and neighboring activities. From cool and educational classes to some of the best eateries in Eastern NC, Beaufort is designed for entertainment inside and out. So if a rainy day happens to coincide with your upcoming Beaufort vacation, use it as an excuse to discover these fascinating and engaging activities that can be effortlessly enjoyed, rain or shine.

Beaufort, NC Museums

Beaufort, NC Museums

The Crystal Coast is renowned for its centuries of history and fascinating attractions, and new visitors will discover that when it comes to maritime heritage, all roads seemingly lead to Beaufort. Renowned as North Carolina’s third oldest town, with a long legacy of being a hopping port community, visitors will find an assortment of museums in the region that pay homage to this history, as well as the local ecosystems and culture that make this area distinctively unique.

Beaufort, NC Boating Guide

Beaufort, NC Boating Guide

As evident by the dozens if not hundreds of vessels that are perched along the downtown docks on a daily basis, Beaufort is clearly a community that’s in love with boating. From marine stores in the heart of the downtown area, to water tours and taxis that cross Taylor’s Creek and the Bogue Sound on an hourly basis, the town of Beaufort is truly a boater’s dream.

Kitty Hawk Kites Beaufort

Kitty Hawk Kites Beaufort

Kitty Hawk Kites has remodeled and opened its new doors directly on the Beaufort waterfront. This shop offers the leading selection of kites, wind art, toys, t-shirts and apparel, Hobie kayaks, and more. In addition, stop by and make your reservation for one of our new Beaufort adventures:

Activities for Kids in Beaufort, NC

Activities for Kids in Beaufort, NC

Beaufort NC is distinctive in that the cool waterfront town can appeal to visitors of all tastes, styles, and ages, and this is especially evident when it comes to the region’s youngest visitors. From wild pirate-themed tours and cruises to afternoon ice cream trips, there are plenty of activities for the young and the young-at-heart to discover. Check out these essential activities for kids on your next Beaufort vacation, and get busy creating fun and amazing memories that will linger well after your Crystal Coast stay is over.

Newport River Pier and Ramp

Newport River Pier and Ramp

The waterfront world of Beaufort, Morehead City, the Shackleford Banks, and everything in between is at a mariner’s fingertips when they launch from the Newport River Pier and Ramp. Located directly on the water in between Morehead City and Beaufort, this sprawling launch site is a popular destination for visiting and local mariners alike.

Rachel Carson Coastal Estuarine Reserve

Rachel Carson Coastal Estuarine Reserve

The Rachel Carson Reserve is a stunning stretch of barely-barrier island shoreline that’s found just off the coast of historic Downtown Beaufort. Covering 2,205 acres, this collection of three islands that are found along Taylor’s Creek at the mouth of the Newport River can be easily and scenically admired from veritably any waterfront vantage point from the heart of town, and are a stunning and undeveloped addition to the vast wildlife scene of the Crystal Coast.

Beaufort Historic Site Visitor Center and Museum

Beaufort Historic Site Visitor Center and Museum

Soak up the centuries-old history of beautiful Beaufort with a visit to the Beaufort Historic Site. Renowned as the third oldest town in North Carolina, there’s a lot of history to explore in this quiet Southern Outer Banks community, and visitors can dive right in by touring a collection of 10 historic homes and structures that are located within the downtown region.

Downtown Beaufort

Downtown Beaufort

Beaufort's historic and altogether picturesque downtown is one of the most visited and most acclaimed town centers in the Inner Banks. Filled with a history that intermingles seamlessly with acclaimed shops and restaurants, (as well as front row views of the activity at the expansive harbor front docks), this otherwise typical Eastern North Carolina town has become a favorite among Inner Banks visitors.

The coastal town of Beaufort has quickly become one of the most popular vacation destinations for Inner Banks travelers and boating enthusiasts of all varieties, and for good reason. The small 2.7 mile town, (surrounded by nearly a mile of water), is a vacationer and maritime lover's dream, with a hearty downtown scene lined with shops, galleries, and acclaimed restaurants, in addition to dozens of maritime supply stores.

Small parks and benches border the seemingly endless docks, and cafes and coffee shops have sprung up all along the harbor front so folks passing through, or anyone enjoying an early morning stroll, can relax with a hot cup of Joe or a big breakfast while enjoying the scene. Home to some of the Inner Banks' best loved dining establishments and galleries, and a 20 minute water taxi or maritime shuttle away from the enticing Shackleford Banks, Beaufort has gained a recognizable name on the North Carolina tourism scene as one of the best spots to unwind and let your inner mariner shine through.

Hundreds of years ago, well before European settlers appeared, the town of Beaufort was called "Cwarioc," or "Fish Town" by the local Coree Indians who called the region home. Early settlers began purchasing property in the region around 1709, and by 1713, a local Craven County merchant hired a surveyor to lay out to the not-yet fully constructed town. The surveyor designated streets and names, including Anne, Queen and Moore Streets, (named after Colonel Moore who ended the Tuscarora War), and the names have stuck ever since. It should be noted that Beaufort's busiest stretch of town, located right along the downtown's waterfront, wasn't constructed until the early 1800s, and as commerce grew along this road, the street was eventually called "Front Street," in honor of its waterfront locale.

After these early town layouts and surveys, Beaufort was officially appointed a port for unloading vessels by the Lords Proprietors, the New World's form of government, and the town blossomed with dozens of lots and sites purchased within the city's limits by merchants, traders, boat builders, and countless other members of the maritime industry. The port town of Beaufort grew, and commerce blossomed.

Unfortunately for the town, a thriving port town was just the sort of allure that attracted pirates in the late 1600s and early 1700s, and sure enough, Beaufort was a popular destination for both Edward Teach, (more commonly known as Blackbeard the Pirate), and his former lieutenant, Stede Bonnett, a gentlemen by birth but eventually a successful pirate in his own right. Both notable pirates were frequent visitors to the Core Sound, located on the outskirts of Beaufort, and also of the town itself - Blackbeard was said to be a regular guest at Beaufort's own "Hammock House."

After the era of pirates had subsided, (with Blackbeard meeting his end off the coast of Ocracoke just 40 or so miles away), the town grew at an unhurried pace, still serving as a port town, and delving into a little bit of the commercial fishing industry that is a prime characteristic of the Outer and Inner Banks.

Today, not much has changed since the town was first patched together in the 1700s. Historic homes stand a block or two away from Front Street, carefully preserved by the Beaufort Historical Association, although more modern buildings have taken up residence along the busier waterfront downtown sections as well, catering to passing mariners, day-trippers, and long weekend or weeklong tourists who want to admire the coastal scene. The area has also become a favorite retirement or second-home spot for water lovers, and new communities can be found outside of the downtown with private boat docks or community boat launches for easy access to both the Shackleford Banks and the Core Sound.

A first-time visitor to Beaufort will find plenty of ways to stay entertained, beginning with the incredible dining options located throughout the town. Several restaurants are historic sites in their own right, dating back over a century, while a half-dozen downtown eateries feature unparalleled outdoor seating overlooking the always busy waterfront docks. All of these restaurants feature fresh seafood in abundance, including oysters, blue crabs, NC shrimps and scallops, and plenty of seasonal fish, and are a perfect destination for any seafood lover.

The downtown also has a renowned collection of shops and galleries that vary from the practical to the downright fun. In Beaufort, travelers will find a bevy of maritime supply stores to replace or add onto existing boating equipment, innumerable galleries, and souvenir shops to take a few treasures back home.

There are a number of adventures to be had in Beaufort as well, and local cruise ships and ferry vessels offer everything from a water taxi to the neighboring Shackleford Banks to full-on pirate cruises with the option to shoot cannonballs at rival vessels.

A quick ferry ride to Shackleford Banks is a very popular venture, as this island is home to the famous "Shackleford Ponies," the barrier islands' feral residents and the supposed descendants of shipwrecked Spanish Mustangs from passing Spanish ships of the 1500s. In addition, the beaches produce some incredible seashells, sand dollars and starfish, and are a sunny and secluded respite for Beaufort visitors who want to soak up miles of the sand and sun. Located just 15-20 minutes away by passenger ferry, with summertime and seasonal departures every 30 minutes or so, a waterfront taxi to a neighboring island is a must for anyone who loves spending the majority of their vacation time on the water.

Accommodations are relatively limited, but very enticing. There are several waterfront inns, complete with boat docks and fantastic views, a number of cabins and vacation rentals, and several campgrounds on the outskirts of the town. There are also a number of Bed and Breakfasts located in converted historic homes along the downtown's side streets, which are idyllic romantic and quiet retreats. Due to Beaufort's growing popularity, especially in the summer season when the climate is warm and inviting and the town is home to a number of events like the annual 4th of July Celebration, advanced reservations are strongly recommended for in-town accommodations. Rooms and vacation rentals can fill up months in advance, and early bookers will enjoy their pick of places to stay, in addition to plenty of time to look forward to their vacation.

Beaufort is, at its heart, a nautical town. Filled with maritime stores, restaurants featuring fresh seafood, and hundreds of docks bordering the waterfront Front Street, this North Carolina community never lost its ties to its history as a reliable port town. A popular destination for maritime traffic and day-trippers alike, visitors will find Beaufort a charming and unique destination, as well as a definite highlight of the Inner Banks' tourism scene.